the_game_database|| news | latest | gallery | upcoming | search: 
Blood Will Tell: Tezuka Osamu's Dororo
  PS2Beat_em_upNA  
  opened by paleface at 02:30:26 10/25/05  
  paleface [sys=PS2; cat=Beat_em_up; loc=NA]
           
The first screenshots I saw for this (known simply as "Dororo" in Japan) looked interesting at first glance, but then I noticed lots of blood and missing body parts. On the main character. Something about this didn't quite sit right with me, but I've had the chance to play a friends copy very briefly, and will thus make some ignorant and hasty comments.
 
The plot has something to do with your character (NOT named Dororo--that's somebody else, I forget who) on a quest to retrieve his twenty-some missing body parts, which have been stolen by, uh, I think it was demons. Anyway, he now has blades and a machinegun in place of forearms and hands, and a cannon in one of his kneecaps, so he's probably better equipped to deal with demons than he would have been if they hadn't stolen his body parts in the first place.
 
In fact, with the press of a shoulder button, he can put hands on over his blades (?) and swing a normal sword. I'm still not sure what the point of that is, then. He's got more reach that way, I guess. So then why take the hands off... I dunno. This is just weird.
 
He can double-jump, and do a couple little sword chain combos, and shoot things. Demons come along, and he dispatches them, and then there's a boss, and you give him the same treatment. So, the first few stages I've played seemed pretty standard, aside from the icky missing body part thing. What kind of gimmick is that, anyway? Bleh. And the action is pretty smooth and all, although maybe just a little stiff when doing chain combos. You can also do weird energy/charge attacks with certain button combinations. Why? Why not?
 
On the one swordblade hand, it's a reasonably smooth action game. On the other blade, it's nothing that hasn't been done on the PS2 already, only with fewer missing limbs.
    

 
2017 paleface.net. Game impressions are the individual contributors. All rights reserved.